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CT-Computed Tomography

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General Information About CT-Computed Tomography

Computed Tomography (CT) produces detailed images of the body, providing information about the internal organs, bones, and soft tissues and with computer generated assistance creates cross-sectional images of body tissues and organs that are used to diagnose diseases and disorders. Before your examination begins, a CT technologist will ask you a few medical questions, explain your procedure and assist you into the CT examination room. You will be asked to lie on a padded table, which will move into the scanner opening for the examination.

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Select Imaging Procedures


CT Chest Without Contrast

CT scanning combines special x-ray equipment with sophisticated computers to produce multiple images or pictures of the inside of the body to detect many lung diseases and abnormalities.


CT Maxillofacial Without Contrast

CT of the sinuses may be used to detect the presence of inflammatory diseases, help plan for surgery by defining anatomy or giving further information about tumors of the nasal cavity and sinuses, evaluate sinuses that are filled with fluid or thickened sinus membranes and help diagnose sinusitis.


CT Pelvis Without Contrast

This CT exam is typically used to help diagnose the cause of abdominal or pelvic pain and diseases of the internal organs, bowel and colon.


CT Head Without Contrast

This CT exam provides more detailed information on head injuries, stroke, brain tumors, and other brain diseases.


CT Abdomen Without Contrast

This CT exam is typically used to help diagnose the cause of abdominal or pelvic pain and diseases of the internal organs, bowel and colon.


CT Abdomen With Contrast

This CT exam is typically used to help diagnose the cause of abdominal or pelvic pain and diseases of the internal organs, bowel and colon. Contrast helps to illuminate disease and may be administered either orally or intravenously.


CT Chest With Contrast

This CT exam is used to further examine abnormalities found on conventional chest x-rays, help diagnose the cause of clinical signs or symptoms of disease of the chest, detect and evaluate the extent of tumors in the chest, assess whether tumors are responding to treatment, help plan radiation therapy, and evaluate injury to the chest. Contrast helps to illuminate disease and may be administered intravenously.

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Download Procedure Preparation Information


Questions About CT-Computed Tomography


Question: What is a CT Screening?

Answer: Computed Tomography (CT) produces detailed images of the body, providing information about the internal organs, bones, and soft tissues and with computer generated assistance creates cross-sectional images of body tissues and organs that are used to diagnose diseases and disorders. Before your examination begins, a CT technologist will ask you a few medical questions, explain your procedure and assist you into the CT examination room. You will be asked to lie on a padded table, which will move into the scanner opening for the examination.


Question: What information should I provide before my CT examination?

Answer: You will be asked to complete a medical questionnaire that will assist in assuring that the highest quality examination is performed.


Question: What should I wear to my examination?

Answer: Please wear comfortable clothing that does not have zippers or other metal fasteners. If you cannot wear this to your exam, a cloth gown or robe will be provided. Lockers are available to store your personal belongings.


Question: Is there any preparation on my part prior to the screening?

Answer: Some CT examinations require oral preparation. For exams that do require preparation, information will be provided to you.


Question: Do I need to bring anything with me to the examination?

Answer: Yes. Please bring your insurance card. Your insurance company will be billed for the procedure. You will receive a bill for any co-pay or non-covered expenses.


Question: May I move during the examination?

Answer: It is important that you remain as still as possible. The technologist may ask you to hold your breath at various times during your procedure so that the images will be clear. It is very similar to having our photo taken.


Question: Is a CT screening painful?

Answer: No. The CT screening is painless; however some procedures require that an IV (intravenous or within a vein) be started for an injection of contrast material that will improve imaging.


Question: How long will the examination last?

Answer: Exam time varies depending on what part of your body is being scanned. You can consult with your CT technologist for more details, when they contact you to confirm your appointment.


Question: How will I receive my CT screening results?

Answer: A Board Certified Radiologist (a physician who specializes in interpreting diagnostic imaging) will study the images from your examination and send a medical report to your physician. Contact your physician to coordinate review of this report and findings.